Our Work is Done, But Gwegwesha’s Needs Continue

This gallery contains 4 photos.

We are PROUD to see how Gwegwesha Day Care Center has progressed since our arrival! We were able to leave them with a small gift.  Remember, the picture I said, “Remember this picture?”  Well, we had it blown up, framed … Continue reading

Bamboo Siding for Gwegwesha Day Care Center

The shelter for the Gwegwesha Day Care Center was made as a Tin Shack with three of the outside walls already covered with wood.  Tin was still displayed on the outside of the front of the shack.  Our third project was to cover the front of the shelter with bamboo.  Shelter sided with bamboo is low maintenance and blends beautifully with natural landscapes.  Bamboo is fast growing grass.

We began this project by going to another location and cutting down the bamboo.  The men used a machete and hand saws to cut it down.

And we, the women carried it the trailer to be transported to Wellington’s place.

Note:  After our first day of cutting down the Bamboo, Amber broke out in an allergic reaction and had to go to the Doctor for medication.  For this reason, she was restricted from working with the bamboo.

Next, we used the machete to clean the bamboo up.  The guys used the machete, hammer and the hand saw to split each one in half.

We, the women, lined up the bamboo and drilled holes in them in for the screws to be placed through.

That was the end of our week.  The next week the other group from our group worked on putting up the bamboo.  When we returned for our final visit, we were able to see the final product!

We all were so proud, on our final review day we used this spot as our back drop for taking pictures.

206

 

 

 

Gwegwesha Day Care Center

This gallery contains 7 photos.

Gwegwesha Day Care Center was motivated, created and founded from a vision of Wellington Kangapi, who is originally from Mzwini. Wellington moved from Mzwini to Cape Town and obtained a job with the South African Police Department.  He worked there … Continue reading

African Angels Independent School

This gallery contains 43 photos.

As Volunteer Interns, we worked in two different projects: African Angels Independent School in Chintsa Gwegwesha Day Care Center in Mzwini African Angels is a non-profit organization based in Chintsa in the Eastern Cape of South Africa that provides quality … Continue reading

Changing my Grandmother Name

Since I’ve been here in South Africa, I’ve decided to change my grandmother name from “MotherDear” to “Magogo,” which means “old lady” in Xhosa/Zulu.  This part of my journey has inspired me to take the name, because it is unlike any other grandmother name in America.

When we met Linda Biehl, she told us how Easy Nofemela and Ntobeko Peni, two of the men convicted for killing her daughter, had become family to her and their children call her “Magogo.”  When we met Lindsay Henley, Program Director of the Beth Uriel, and she informed us that the boys of the house call her “Magogo” as well.  Even though, she has been working there since she was in her 20s and was far from being an old lady, it was a name that gave her a family title.

“Magogo” is the Grandmother that cares for her family and extended family. It is traditional in African culture to take in children as part of the family who need care. And it is often the Magogo who takes care of these children with her pension and whatever means she can find. She too will tell stories to the children and anyone who will listen.

This name has grown on me and I must adopt it!  This grandmother name change will also allow me to mark this part of my journey in my life.  Since my only grandbaby, Mink (18 months) has not yet begin to speak my name, I think it’s a great time to implement a grandmother name change!  “Magogo!”  I LOVE IT!!